OnCamera and Using Your Phone as a Defensive Tool

So earlier today, somebody showed me this video of the use of an app called OnCamera. The idea is that a potential victim, who has already signed up for the service, notices an attack about to come upon her (or him, let’s not be sexist, here). She grabs her phone out of her purse or pocket, presses a “big red button”. That person would almost immediately be in a two-way video conversation with the police. The victim would point the phone at the attacker – presumably so the camera would record his/her face), and a live police officer “First Officer” says something like “Your face has been recorded. If you walk away, you will be free to go. If you continue, you will be arrested…” blah blah blah. Continue reading OnCamera and Using Your Phone as a Defensive Tool

Share Button

Mythbusting In Social Media

So every so often (like, several times a day), I am confronted with some Facebook post, or a tweet, or an email, or some off-the-cuff comment by a person. And this post/tweet/email/comment (I’ll shorten it to “comment”) usually will spout some stat, or claim some horrible act was occurring, or tell us that a scientific study “proved” that candy corn cures diabetes (or something equally as stupid/unlikely).

So why is it that so many people find the first comment on Facebook or email, and forward that along as gospel truth?
Continue reading Mythbusting In Social Media

Share Button

BOOK REVIEW – Ghost in the Wires (Kevin Mitnick & Steve Wozniak)

Ghost in the Wires is a fantastic book for, by, and about hackers. And it’s not written to be read just by hackers or computer security professionals, but for anybody who might find some interest in the topic. Continue reading BOOK REVIEW – Ghost in the Wires (Kevin Mitnick & Steve Wozniak)

Share Button